Edward Lear, Plain of Damascus (1855)

Edward Lear, Plain of Damascus coming from Hermon.
Inscribed with title lower left, signed with initials lower right, 28th May 1855. Watercolour, 14.5cm x 21.5cm.

The Saleroom.

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Edward Lear, Middle Eastern Landscape

Edward Lear, Middle Eastern landscape with figure approaching a ruined tower and classical columns in the distance, signed with monogram, and dated 1873, watercolour with scratching out, 10 x 20cm; and companion, a pair (2).

[This one might well be a view of the Roman Campagna, in my opinion.]

Prov: With Foord & Dickinson, 90 Wardour St, London.

[This also looks like it might be a picture of the Campagna.]

The Saleroom.

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Edward Lear, Gebel Wardan (1849)

Edward Lear, Gebel Wardan, Sinai.
Inscribed and dated l.r.: Gebel Wardan 10.50.AM. / 19.Jany. 1849 (64). Brown ink and pencil. 7.5 x 35.5cm / 2.9 x 14.0in.

Provenance: 
Mr and Mrs Godfrey Pilkington of the Piccadilly Gallery

Lear drew a large number of sketches on his travels through Egypt and the Sinai desert, having left Malta for Alexandria at the start of 1849. We know that later on this day in 1849, he was close to Hawara, the site of a complex Roman subterranean necropolis and the pyramid of Amenemhat III (No. 70 in the series depicts an Encampent Near Hawara, sold Christie’s, South Kensington, Old Master and Early British Drawings and Watercolours, 6th December 2012, Lot 277)

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Readings and Listenings

I missed this review of Jenny Uglow’s Mr Lear, you can read it here.

Listen to three Edward Lear arrangements, in Hungarian Translatio, by György Kósa:

The music comes from Kósa György: Home Concert – Songs and Chamber Works; Bokor Jutta, Judit Kiss-Domonos, Korondi Anna, Kósa Gábor. Hungaroton, 2007. HGR 32486.

The translations are taken from Edward Lear’s Boldog bolondságok, translated by Hajnal Anna, Illustrated by Gyulai Líviusz. Budapest, 1978. 64 p., ill.

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Edward Lear, Abetone (1883)

Edward Lear, Abetone.
Inscribed Abetone/ 19. August/ 1883 3.15pm in pencil and in ink. Watercolour with pen and ink 9.2 x 16.5cm. Abetone lies 80km north west of Florence, in Tuscany.

UKAuctioneers.com.

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Edward Lear, Alderly (1837)

Edward Lear, Alderly, 1837, figures walking in a park.
Charcoal with white heightening on gray paper under Plexiglas. Signed lower left: Edward Lear, dated and titled lower right: June, 1837 . Sheet: 9.75″ H x 14″ W. Condition: Generally good condition. Framed floating and mounted to the back mat. Not examined out of the frame. Frame: 19″ H x 22.75″ W x 1″ D.

The Saleroom.

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More to Read (in a few days)

This Book, Marie Duval, edited by Simon Grennan, Roger Sabin and Julian Waite, has been available for some time: it has been a bit of a disappointment as the critical apparatus is almost non-existent. However, this is the only way to get some of Duval’s material in print. Much more is available online t the Marie Duval Archive. I discussed Marie Duval, whom I consider strongly influenced by Edward Lear’s nonsense, and her book A Choice Collection of Queens and Kings, and Other Things here.

James Williams’s long-awaited book on Edward Lear will be published at the end of the month, but on the publisher’s website you can find a lot of information, including an intriguing table of content.

They also tell me that the catalogue on Edward Lear in Amalfi has been printed and will be available soon (I haven’t seen a paper copy yet!). Tonight at 21:00 CET, RTC QuartaRete, a local channel will broadcast a long interview with Federico Guida discussing the book (in Italian of course). The program will be broadcast also on Wednesday 19 at 14:25, Thursday 20 at 23:25, Saturday 22 at 17:25 and Sunday 23 at 18:00.

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