Edward Lear’s Death Certificate

Federico Guida, who has just finished editing a forthcoming, illustrated book on Edward Lear’s stay in Corpo della Cava and the surrounding area (which will contain two essays of mine, btw) sends me a scan of Edward Lear’s Italian death certificate, which is available from Antenati: Gli archivi per la ricerca anagrafica.

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A Little More to Read on Edward Lear

Cara Giaimo on Edward Lear as “a Teenage Parrot-Painting Prodigy” from Atlas Obscura.

And Matthew Bevis’s long review of Jenny Uglow’s Mr Lear for the London Review of Books, vol. 39, no. 24 (only available to subscribers, unfortunately).

I have also found out that many of John Gould’s books on birds are available at Archive.org.

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Edward Lear, The Monastery of Stavronikita, Mount Athos (1856)

Edward Lear, The Monastery of Stavronikita, Mount Athos.
Inscribed and dated ‘Stavronikeles.[sic]/ 2. Septr. 1856.’ (lower left) and ‘Ilex a oak’ (lower right), numbered ’42’ (lower right) and ‘1’ (verso)and further inscribed with notes. Pencil, pen and brown ink and watercolour. 6 1/8 x 9 1/8 in. (15.6 x 23.2 cm.)

Provenance
Charles Church, a gift from the artist, and by descent to the present owner.

Christie’s.

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Edward Lear, The portico entrance of a monastery, possibly Vatopaidi, Mount Athos (1856)

Edward Lear, The portico entrance of a monastery, possibly Vatopaidi, Mount Athos.
Inscribed in Greek and dated ‘Balo & Paidion[?]/ 18. Sept. 1856.’ (lower right), numbered ’92’ (lower right) and ‘1’ (verso) and further inscribed with colour notes. Pencil, pen and ink and watercolour on paper. 10 1/8 x 8 5/8 in. (25.7 x 21.9 cm.)

Provenance
Charles Church, a gift from the artist, and by descent to the present owner.

Christie’s.

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Edward Lear, The monastery of Great Lavra, Mount Athos (1856)

Edward Lear, The monastery of Great Lavra, Mount Athos.
Inscribed in Greek and dated ‘Lavra./ 6. Septr. 1856.’ and numbered ’26’ twice (lower right) and ‘2’ (verso) and further inscribed with colour notes. Pencil, pen and brown ink and watercolour. 6 ¼ x 10 1/8 in. (15.9 x 25.7 cm.)

Provenance
Charles Church, a gift from the artist, and by descent to the present owner.

During Lear’s long tour of Mount Athos in September 1856 he travelled throughout the peninsular and succeeded in visiting all twenty principal monasteries and many of their dependencies. He produced a series of fifty drawings of the monasteries and landscapes, of which the following three drawings are part. He apparently intended to publish a volume of his tour of Mount Athos but this was never fulfilled, although he did adapt several of his drawings for his series of illustrations to Tennyson’s poems.

Charles Church (1823-1915), later the Dean of Wells, met Lear in Italy in the winter of 1847, whilst Church was travelling through Europe on his way to stay with his uncle Sir Richard Church (1784-1873), who had commanded the Greek forces in the War of Independence against Turkey. The two men travelled together through Greece in the summer of 1848 and became lifelong friends. Church amassed a considerable collection of his friend’s work.

Christie’s.

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The Harvard Library Bulletin on Edward Lear is Now Online

You can reach it from Matthew Bevis’s Aspects of Edward Lear (Part I), we’re looking forward to Part II then, or directly from here.

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More to Read on Edward Lear &c.

Matthew Kerr reviews Jenny Uglow’s Mr. Lear for Apollo.

Raffaella Antinucci has two articles on Nonsense and Edward Lear I’m not sure I mentioned before:

  • “«Sensational nonsense»: Edward Lear and the (Im)purity of Nonsense Writing” English Literature 2.2 (2015). (download)
  • “‘…in those few bright (Abruzzi) days’: Edward Lear’s landscaping gaze and the discovery of Abruzzo” RVS: Rivista di Studi Vittoriani 34-35 (2013). (download)

Finally, a very important essay by Constance W. Hassett, “‘Does It Buzz?’: Image and Text in Edward Lear’s Limericks.” Victorian Literature and Culture 45 (2017), 685-707.
Sorry, no link for this one, but try to find and read it! It led me to the Academy review of a couple of posts back and to a short collection of limericks by Anthony Madrid illustrated by Mark Fletcher.

The European Journal of Humour Research, vol 5 issue 3, has a special issue online on “Humour in Nonsense Literature.

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